On the summit with a southern view in the background (photo by Mark Malnati)



Stinson Mountain

Mountain:  Stinson Mtn. (2900')
Trails:  Stinson Mountain Trail, Snowmobile Trail
Region:  NH - Central West  
White Mountain National Forest, Moosilauke Region
Location:  Rumney, NH
Rating:  Moderate  
Features:  Summit, views, loop hike
Distance:  4.2 miles  
Elevation Gain:  1425 feet (cumulative)  
Hiking Time:  Typical: 2:50  
Outing Duration:  Actual: 3:00   Typical: 4:00  
Season:  Winter
Hike Date:  02/09/2008 (Saturday)  
Weather:  20-26 degrees
Author:  Diane King
Companion:  Fifteen SDHers and 2 dogs

Icy branches (photo by Mark Malnati) Route Summary   

This can be either an up-and-back hike to Stinson Mountain or a loop hike when using the standard hiking trail in conjunction with a snowmobile trail.

Ascent:
  • Since Lower Doe Town Road was unplowed, this hike started at the intersection of this street with Cross Road.
  • Follow Lower Doe Town Road for 0.3 mile and then bear left where there is a parking area and the trailhead.
  • Follow Stinson Mountain Trail for 0.9 mile, then bear left.
  • After 0.2 mile bear right to follow the hiking trail while a snowmobile trail goes to the left.
  • Keep following the trail for just under another 0.7 mile at which point it rejoins the snowmobile trail.
  • There will be another branching of the trail which forms a very short loop; take either leg to reach the summit.
  • At the summit, look for a spur path at the northwest base of the ledges. This will lead in about 80 yards to a view over Stinson Lake.

Descent:
  • To return the same way you came up: turn left at the base of the summit loop, go straight 0.7 mile down from the summit where the snowmobile trail enters from the right, then 0.2 mile later, turn right. Upon reaching the unplowed road, turn right to return to your vehicle.
  • To return via the snowmobile trail: turn right at the base of the summit loop, go straight 0.7 mile down from the summit where the hiking trail enters from the left, then 0.2 mile later, turn right. Upon reaching the unplowed road, turn right to return to your vehicle. The snowmobile trail is a slightly longer route than the hiking path.

View from the summit (photo by Mark Malnati)


Place         Split
Miles
     Total
Miles
Jct. Cross Road/Lower Doe Town Road (1475') 0.0 0.0
Stinson Mtn. Trailhead (1495') 0.3 0.3
Jct. Stinson Mtn. Trail/Snowmobile Trail (2200') 1.1 1.4
Stinson Mtn. summit (2900') 0.7 2.1
Jct. Stinson Mtn. Trail/Snowmobile Trail (2200') 0.7 2.8
Stinson Mtn. Trailhead (1495') 1.1 3.9
Jct. Cross Road/Lower Doe Town Road (1475') 0.3 4.2
Donna (photo by Mark Malnati)


Quincy, Claudette, and Jack (photo by Mark Malnati)
 

 

Map of hike route to Stinson Mountain (map by Webmaster)


Trail Guide   

After more than a week of on and off rain, snow, sleet, drizzle and gray skies fifteen dayhikers and two dogs (make that 1-1/4 dogs since Quincy is such a tiny pupply) gathered at the intersection of Cross Road and Lower Doe Town Road and bit the bullet. We trekked an additional 0.3 mile on Lower Doe Town Road which was unplowed, but reasonably groomed, to the trailhead. Most wore snowshoes and that was certainly all that was necessary.

Quincy and Tessa on the trail (photo by Mark Malnati) Others had been on the trail prior to us so we didn't have to work hard to get to the junction where the snowmobile trail and hiker trail split. One person opted to head up the snowmobile trail while the rest let Jack scoot ahead and break the trail–thanks Jack!

I think the best scenery of the hike was on the way up when the icy branches were covered in fluffy snow against the backdrop of grayness. Skies were overcast with a hint of brightness as we ploughed our way up the windy trail to the summit. The snowmobilers were nowhere in sight when we arrived, although we did see them here and there along the way enjoying their terrain and allowing us to do so as well.

There was a decent view and the sun seemed to shine down on the valley below. After a group photo op we headed down. Half took the snowmobile trail and half took the hiking trail.

Eventually clouds were chased away by blue sky and sunshine. It was a comfortable 20-26 degrees as we covered the 4.2 miles in just under 3 hours, including our long lunch break up top.
 
Stinston Mountain Trail sign (photo by Mark Malnati)

 

Claudette emerging from the trees on Stinson Mountain Trail (photo by Mark Malnati) Julie and Reinhild on the trail (photo by Mark Malnati)

 


NH - Central West


  Driving Directions   

Stinson Mountain Trailhead is located in Rumney, New Hampshire, indirectly off of Route 25.

  • Take exit 26 off of I-93.
  • Follow Rt. 25 west for 7.3 miles.
  • Turn right onto Main Street which later becomes Stinson Lake Road. Follow this road for 5.0 miles from Rt. 25.
  • At the foot of the lake turn right uphill onto Cross Road (if you reach the general store and post office then you've missed the Cross Road turn by 0.1 mile).
  • Follow Cross Road for 0.8 mile and then turn right onto Lower Doe Town Road.
  • When the road is clear, proceed on Lower Doe Town Road for 0.3 mile, then bear left into a parking lot; otherwise park on Cross Road taking care not to block any road access.

Group (photo by Mark Malnati)


Other Notes   

A parking permit is required to park at White Mountain National Forest trailheads and parking areas. You can purchase a WMNF permit from the forest service and other vendors and can also pay-by-the-day using self-service kiosks located in many parking areas.

For more information on parking passes please refer to the White Mountain National Forest website.

Rates:
  • $3 per day
  • $5 for a week-long pass
  • $20 for a year-long pass
  • $25 for two year-long passes (one household/two cars)
 

Stay overnight in a tipi
Gift Certificates Available

 

Stinson Mountain Trail (photo by Mark Malnati) Snowy trees (photo by Mark Malnati)

 

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